Left Hand Brewing Company Milk Stout Nitro

Review by Eric Tansey, CSW,Sommelier
The Left Hand Brewing Company Milk Stout Nitro has aromas of roasted marshmallow and dark soil. The color of the beer is dark black and opaque with a very inviting caramel colored head at about one and a half fingers.

On the palate the Left Hand Brewing Company Milk Stout Nitro has a full bodied, creamy mouthfeel with taste characteristics of slightly roasted malt, browned marshmallow–the type my mom slow roasts over the embers of a campfire–and a very subtle touch of cocoa powder. The finish is very dry and black soil-esque. Reminds me of fresh black Florida garden soil.

The Left Hand Brewing Company Milk Stout Nitro is a soothing beer that will be sure to warm your heart on a cold day. Cheers! Eric Tansey, CSW   Also try Duck Rabbit Milk Stout

Tansey’s Blind Rating – 84 Points 

BeerAdvocate – 91 Points 


The Breakdown

93%
Body
25%
Bitterness
25%
Hops
75%
Malt
60%
Yeast
35%
Fruitiness

Beer Selection – Milk Stout Nitro

Producer – Left Hand Brewing Company

Region – Longmont, Colorado 

Style – Milk Stout

IBU – 25

Malts – Pale 2-row, Crystal, Munich, Roasted Barley, Flaked Oats, Flaked Barley and Chocolate

Hops – Magnum and US Goldings

Lactose

Alcohol – 6%

Food Pairing –  Stews, shepherds pie, bison chili.


What is a Milk Stout?  

Let’s begin with stouts. Stouts are basically dark porters. Stouts and porters are beers made with roasted malts, hops, water, and yeast, the only difference is the amount of roasting in the malts and the barley. A milk stout is a stout with lactose, hence the “milk” in “milk stout.”

Lactose is a sugar that cannot be fermented by beer yeast, so it leaves a sweet, milky like taste in the stout beer that I often assimilate with marshmallows. Cheers! Eric Tansey, CSW

What is Nitro?

Nitro means simply carbonating the beer with nitrogen. Nitro gives the beer tighter bubbles and a creamier texture. It also adds a little art to the pint glass. Nitro stouts often have what is called a cascading effect in the glass, where the tiny caramel colored bubbles sparkle through the dark beer.

Imagine watching a diver jumping off of a diving board, from under the water. The cascade of bubbles that appears behind the diver in the water is the same thing you see when you poor a Nitro beer: cascading bubbles. Cheers! Eric Tansey, CSW,Sommelier